Archive for the ‘Free 30-day Spanish course for travellers’ Category

Love it or hate it, el trabajo is a fact of life. Here are the basics, but please leave a comment below if your job isn’t listed.

¿Cuál es tu trabajo? ¿A qué te dedicás? = What’s your job?

Soy …  = I’m a … (Note that in English we say I’m a teacher but in Spanish it’s Soy profesor and NOT Soy un profesor)

maestro/a = primary school teacher

profesor/a = secondary school teacher

abogado/a = lawyer

ingeniero/a = engineer

administrador / administradora = administrator

empleado público = civil servant

gerente = manager

diseñador/a = designer

asesor/a = consultant

 

Note these exceptions, which use the verb estar instead of ser:

Estoy desempleado/a / Estoy sin trabajo = I’m unemployed

Estoy jubilado/a = I’m retired

 

¿Dónde trabajás? = Where do you work?

Trabajo en … = I work in a…

  • una empresa grande / chica = a big / small company
  • una oficina = an office
  • una fábrica = a factory
  • una tienda = a clothes shop
  • un comercio = a shop
  • un supermercado = a supermarket
  • una escuela = a primary school
  • un liceo = a secondary school / high school
  • una universidad pública / privada = a public / private university
  • un taller = a workshop
  • un estudio = a studio

¿Hace cuánto que trabajás ahí?  = How long have you worked there? (informal vos)

¿Hace cuánto que está jubilado usted? = How long have you been retired? (formal usted)

Hace seis años que trabajo en la embajada alemana. = I’ve worked in the German Embassy for six years.

¿Cómo es tu trabajo? ¿Te gusta tu trabajo? = What’s your job like? Do you like your job?

Es un trabajo interesante / estresante. = It’s an interesting / stressful job.

 

NOTE:

compañero/a de trabajo = colleague

un/una colega = someone who has the same job title as you. For example, two maths teachers who work at different schools are colegas but not compañeros de trabajo.

 

Any questions? If you’re not sure about the content of today’s class or have something to add, leave us a comment below and we’ll get back to you. Your questions and comments will help other students too. Our Spanish immersion programs at La Herradura in Uruguay and Spain teach you an international form of Spanish, but the teachers are all native speakers and will offer guidance on local expressions and words.

Coming up next… Class 27: Games | Los juegos

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The parilla is a River Plate institution and there are a lot of specialist terms to understand if you want to make your way around a parilla menu. First of all the word la parilla, which refers to the grill on which the meat is cooked, is not to be confused with la parillada (a parilla restaurant OR a selection of meats from the parilla: you can order una parillada para dos, for example, which is a meat platter for two people) or el parillero (the person who barbecues the meat on the parilla OR a built barbecue).

El asado de tira is the favourite cut of many Uruguayans and Argentinians, whereas el vacío, el lomo, la pulpa are bone-free and as such preferred by many visitors to the region. The diagram will show you exactly which cuts they are (don’t ask me, I’m a vegetarian!).

la costilla = ribs

los chinchulines = small intestines, usually wrapped around a skewer

la tripa gorda = a plait of small intestine

la molleja = saliva glands

el riñon = kidney

el hígado = liver

la morcilla = blood sausage

el chorizo = thick sausage

la longaniza = thin sausage

el cordero = lamb

el cerdo = pork

la bondiola = pork chop

el jabalí = boar 

 

And a couple of other items that might just make it onto the parilla:

el morrón relleno = stuffed pepper (usually stuffed with cheese and ham)

la berenjena = aubergine / eggplant

el queso provelone = melted cheese with herbs and, sometimes, ham, olives or peppers

una papa asada = baked potato

 

Any questions? If you’re not sure about the content of today’s class or have something to add, leave us a comment below and we’ll get back to you. Your questions and comments will help other students too. Our Spanish immersion programs at La Herradura in Uruguay and Spain teach you an international form of Spanish, but the teachers are all native speakers and will offer guidance on local expressions and words.

Coming up next… Class 26: Work | El trabajo

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Mate is such an institution it deserves a dedicated section of this phrasebook. The word mate refers specifically to the hollow gourd from which it is drunk, but also to the drink more generally. However, the green herb that you use to make the infusion is not called mate, it’s yerba, or yerba mate. There are countless different brands and types, with varying levels of strength and diverse herbal mixes and corresponding claims regarding health benefits.

 

el mate = the mate gourd (made from a type of pumpkin or calabaza)

la bombilla = the metal straw with a filter at one end

el termo = thermos flask

la tapa del termo = the thermos lid

la yerba = the green stuff (or, to be more specific, the leaves of the Ilex paraguariensis plant, dried, toasted and ground into a powder)

la yerba compuesta = a mix of yerba and other yuyos or herbs

una ronda de mate = a round of mate

mate dulce / amargo = sweet / bitter mate (it’s not common to add sugar to your mate but some people do)

 

hinchar = to swell (as you begin a round of mate, you have to wait for the yerba to swell up so that it releases the flavour and doesn’t go up the straw)

chupar = to suck (make sure you finish ALL the liquid in the mate when it’s your turn, so the next person doesn’t have to drink your saliva! Gross but true!)

darle vuelta (al mate) = to turn the mate (as you keep topping up with hot water, you gradually work your way around the mate to wet the dry yerba bit by bit, not all at once).

lavar = to lose flavour (literally, wash out, this is what happens when you’ve been drinking the same mate for a while. It’s time to stop, or start again with fresh yerba. But, if you get all the yerba wet at the beginning, it wil wash out very quickly. That’s why the step above is important).

 

¿Tomás mate? = Do you drink mate? (This is among the first questions foreigners in Uruguay will be asked, right after where do you come from.)

Está muy caliente / medio lavado. = It’s really hot / a bit washed out.

¡Ay! ¡Me quemé la mano! = Ow! I burned my hand! (one of the hazards of drinking mate)

 

Exercise: Send us a photo of you with your mate! 

 

Any questions? If you’re not sure about the content of today’s class or have something to add, leave us a comment below and we’ll get back to you. Your questions and comments will help other students too. Our Spanish immersion programs at La Herradura in Uruguay and Spain teach you an international form of Spanish, but the teachers are all native speakers and will offer guidance on local expressions and words.

Coming up next… Class 25: La Parilla

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